Jump to content


Photo

Photography hints, tips and whatever for Otakon


This topic has been archived. This means that you cannot reply to this topic.
76 replies to this topic

#51 bobwill

bobwill

    Neophyte Otaku

  • Otakon Staff
  • Pip
  • 61 posts

Posted 12 July 2011 - 07:33 PM

One thing that I do with my pictures, I carry a ton of memory cards, they're cheap, there's no reason to rely on just 1.
Also, I will not format a card until it is not only on a harddrive; but, I will wait until I have a known good backup of that file.
That way, if I have a harddrive failure, I have atleast one other copy on a backup drive, or on Mozy, or on my memory card.

If it's worth keeping, it's worth keeping in atleast 2 places.
Robert Williams


2010 - 2014 Photosuite Staff
2009 Otakon Panels Staff

#52 Clutch

Clutch

    Otaku In Training

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 290 posts

Posted 13 July 2011 - 05:39 AM

T2i user here, gonna be my first Otakon with this nice little toy. This thread has definitely been helpful, thank you! :P


Great starter camera! It also stands up well against my D90 with a few more capabilities.

Make sure you get a class 6 or higher SDXC card (higher the class, the faster it can "talk" to your camera). 8GB at a minimum. I have two 8GB and one 16GB card. Since your camera can shoot 1080p, you may want a 16GB. (at 720p, it shoots at 60 fps vs 24-30 fps on 1080p) Also, whenever you have the opportunity, download your images and re-format the SD stick in your camera. To reiterate: Don't set your camera to shoot at max MP, select the next level down. Remember, a 6MP image makes a great 8x10 picture. 12 MP can make 20x30. Lower your MP and get more pictures on your SD stick.

Most importantly -- READ YOUR MANUAL!

Why reformat? Doesn't that put additional wear on the card? I leave the images on the card; shooting with the largest image size, and highest quality, for the camera. However, there is still a ton of space left on the card.
Otakon attendee since 1994 Posted Image
Posted Image

#53 bobwill

bobwill

    Neophyte Otaku

  • Otakon Staff
  • Pip
  • 61 posts

Posted 13 July 2011 - 10:37 AM

T2i user here, gonna be my first Otakon with this nice little toy. This thread has definitely been helpful, thank you! :P


Great starter camera! It also stands up well against my D90 with a few more capabilities.

Make sure you get a class 6 or higher SDXC card (higher the class, the faster it can "talk" to your camera). 8GB at a minimum. I have two 8GB and one 16GB card. Since your camera can shoot 1080p, you may want a 16GB. (at 720p, it shoots at 60 fps vs 24-30 fps on 1080p) Also, whenever you have the opportunity, download your images and re-format the SD stick in your camera. To reiterate: Don't set your camera to shoot at max MP, select the next level down. Remember, a 6MP image makes a great 8x10 picture. 12 MP can make 20x30. Lower your MP and get more pictures on your SD stick.

Most importantly -- READ YOUR MANUAL!

Why reformat? Doesn't that put additional wear on the card? I leave the images on the card; shooting with the largest image size, and highest quality, for the camera. However, there is still a ton of space left on the card.

Well, formatting shouldn't cause too much in the way of accelerated wear on the card versus deleting all of the files.

When you format in FAT it just resets the File Allocation Table to its default state, which would generally mean every space that isn't needed for the system operate is now available to use. That would be a write to a very small portion of the drive. Now, if the card and camera supports the TRIM command (I don't know if SD does or not, or if any cameras do) then it should eventually do garbage collection and 0 out every location on the card that isn't being used, which would be 1 more write to potentially the entire card. But, if TRIM is used, it wouldn't matter if it's a format or a deletion, it would eventually collect the garbage data remnants and set everything that's unused to 0.

Any modern flash memory device should support wear leveling which basically makes an extra layer of hardware management between the actual storage space and the host device. The card should be keeping track of the number of times each cell in the card has been written to and it will automatically write to locations with the fewest writes. So, when the file allocation table gets reset, it shouldn't just stay on the same cells destroying them, it should be moving it to some other location on the disk to prevent having one spot wear out earlier than the rest.

FAT is a very old, very simple structure with very little in the way of redundancy, or data protection, which is why back in the days before Windows XP you could routinely run scandisk and find file errors that weren't hardware related. Regular formatting helps prevent problems in the long run because you don't really give the system a long time to develop lots of cumulative problems that could ultimately result in lost photos because the FAT became corrupted for some reason.
Robert Williams


2010 - 2014 Photosuite Staff
2009 Otakon Panels Staff

#54 Otaku Ru

Otaku Ru

    Disciplinary Committee Chair

  • Veteran Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,733 posts

Posted 13 July 2011 - 10:49 PM

T2i user here, gonna be my first Otakon with this nice little toy. This thread has definitely been helpful, thank you! :D


Great starter camera! It also stands up well against my D90 with a few more capabilities.

Make sure you get a class 6 or higher SDXC card (higher the class, the faster it can "talk" to your camera). 8GB at a minimum. I have two 8GB and one 16GB card. Since your camera can shoot 1080p, you may want a 16GB. (at 720p, it shoots at 60 fps vs 24-30 fps on 1080p) Also, whenever you have the opportunity, download your images and re-format the SD stick in your camera. To reiterate: Don't set your camera to shoot at max MP, select the next level down. Remember, a 6MP image makes a great 8x10 picture. 12 MP can make 20x30. Lower your MP and get more pictures on your SD stick.

Most importantly -- READ YOUR MANUAL!

I got a Transcend class-10 16GB, it records HD video at 60 frames like a dream. I do a low-level format every time I dump my card, so nothing to worry about there. Thanks for looking out for a DSLR newbie! :3

gama2014_zps45cead10.jpg

 

Facebook | Soundcloud

[John B., Member '07, '09-'12, '14]

 

Fanvideos:  2014 | 2012 | 2011

 

 


#55 MalaikaDream

MalaikaDream

    Neophyte Otaku

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 56 posts

Posted 14 July 2011 - 04:50 AM

Fantastic tips! I opted not to bring my Canon D40 anymore due to it's bulky size and too great a damage risk, since I cosplay myself and the constant on and off of the camera had me worried. I bought myself a Kodak easy share this year, the quality isn't as good but it's simple and small, great for taking memories :P

#56 bobwill

bobwill

    Neophyte Otaku

  • Otakon Staff
  • Pip
  • 61 posts

Posted 15 July 2011 - 07:53 PM

When trying something different (such as following advise on this thread) from what you've always done, review what you have every once in a while to make sure you're happy with what you're getting. It's not fun to spend hours trying to figure out how to fix hundreds of pictures you're not particularly happy with.
Robert Williams


2010 - 2014 Photosuite Staff
2009 Otakon Panels Staff

#57 Gremlich

Gremlich

    Otaku In Training

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 234 posts

Posted 06 November 2011 - 05:14 PM

Here's something people should try next year - painting with light. I mentioned this in the thread and found this image on 500px:
Otakon attendee since 1996 - been watching anime since the 1960's
Member number is really 1,321.

#58 The INfamous MC

The INfamous MC

    Fine, I'm guilty! I wear false eyelashes!

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,400 posts

Posted 27 February 2012 - 11:27 PM

Hi All,

I am pinning this post because I think it's a great thread for taking photos at Otakon. If anyone else has some tips, please feel free to share them!

Robin L. Vial
Otakorp, Inc. Chief of Staff 2014
Otakon Staff since 2002, so I've done a lot on staff. Frm Gofer (2001) and TCG (2002) #117
Been going to Otakon since 2000.
BBS Moderator: The Originator of Staying on Topic since 2002


#59 Gremlich

Gremlich

    Otaku In Training

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 234 posts

Posted 28 February 2012 - 05:47 PM

Thanx MC for doing this!!

To start off, I hope many of you get something useful out of this thread and will perhaps post something we all can benefit from.

First off - SOMETHING FREE!!!

Craft and Vision has a free download entitled "11 Ways to Improve Your Photography". Craft and Vision has loads of other ebooks cheap

It is available as a PDF or as an iPad ebook reader file. The only thing you need to provide is your first and last name and your email addy. You will actually be taken to an order page where the cost is listed as $0.00. You provide nothing else and when you submit, you will get two emails - one that says you ordered it and the other with a link to where you can download it. You don't need the link because you can actually download the file while you are still on their website.

Smartphone photography??

some great apps to use: Nik Software's "Snapseed" sadly, no android support yet. You iPhone kids have fun with it though. (on the site, click on "mobile" to see requirements)

I, myself, do not use a smartphone, so you are kind of on your own. I am sure, however that other con-goers do use them and hope they will post tips for use and software here. I know there are other tools out there that will allow you to process your pics at the Con and post to flickr, facebook or what have you in relatively short time.

Last thing, though, for that crowd is Mobile Phone Photography, a series of tutorials.

I am looking for photograhy policy, whether from city, BCC or the Con staff about what is reasonable to bring for kit and what is excessive and what your rights are while you are at the Con (David Hobby's blog on avoiding cops is good). I recommend to pack a minimum of kit - only the lenses you know you'll need for dSLR shooters, monopod, one or two speedlights (you can use human light stands), diffuser(s) (ping pong balls, a Gary Fong, lastolite panels) MAYBE one umbrella. Joe McNally's information on his site and on Scott Kelby's are fantastic and you can learn quite a bit

For kit suggestions for dSLR owners, I recommend The Strobist's traveling light blog.

Cheers and don't be shy about posting here. You want to take great pictures and share them? This is a great event for that and this thread may help.

Oh, and look at lots of pictures to gain inspiration.

Edited by Gremlich, 28 February 2012 - 05:48 PM.

Otakon attendee since 1996 - been watching anime since the 1960's
Member number is really 1,321.

#60 KSweeley

KSweeley

    Otakon Staff since 2010, Otakon Attendee since 2001.

  • Otakon Staff
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,343 posts

Posted 28 February 2012 - 05:53 PM

A tip regarding where to take pictures at Otakon: Please don't take pictures in high-traffic areas of the convention (example: the skybridge that connects the old half and the new half of the BCC and the skybridge that connects the BCC with the Hilton Baltimore Convention Center hotel, in the Pratt Street lobby area, etc.), I've had situations where I needed to get to a specific area of the BCC and people are in the middle of the high-traffic areas of the convention taking pictures and I'm yelling "EXCUSE ME!!!! EXCUSE ME!!!!" and people are still taking pictures and then they get pissed off when I walk in front of the people taking pictures so if you see a cosplayer you would love to take a picture of walking in a high-traffic area, please go to that cosplayer and ask "May I take your picture however can we move to a less busy area to take a picture of you?" instead of inconveniencing Otakon staff members who may need to get to a specific area within the convention but can't wait until people finish taking a picture of a cosplayer or a group of cosplayers in a high-traffic area of the convention.

Thanks in advance!!!

Edited by KSweeley, 28 February 2012 - 05:55 PM.

Kun Sun Sweeley (KSweeley) | Otakorp, Inc. Voting Member 2010-15 | Otakon 2015 Staff - ????? Division - ????? Department |Otakon 2014 Staff - Exhibitions Divison - Art Show Department | Otakon 2013 Staff - Member Relations (formerly Member Services) Division - General Staff Department, Otakon 2011-2012 Staff - Programming Division - Otachan Department, Otakon 2010 Staff - Staff Relations Division - Staff Pool Department | (former Gofer 2004, TCG 2005-06, 2008, Tier 2: 2009 #403) | Otakon 2001-2014 Attendee | Chat with me on AIM: WeezingPok | Add Me On Steam: http://steamcommunity.com/id/ksweeley/ | Add Me As a Friend on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/ksweeley

 


#61 Gremlich

Gremlich

    Otaku In Training

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 234 posts

Posted 29 February 2012 - 05:15 PM

Photoshop Touch intro for iPad and Android at Scott Kelby's site. It's a video
Otakon attendee since 1996 - been watching anime since the 1960's
Member number is really 1,321.

#62 Gremlich

Gremlich

    Otaku In Training

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 234 posts

Posted 10 March 2012 - 07:24 AM

Doing video with a dSLR? If you do not already know, if you are using SD cards/sticks, use the class 10. Class 6 will work fine, but if you want better results, use the faster cards/sticks. Class 4 and below are great for MP3 players (meaning OLDER tech). For CF cards, use 133x and above. A Kingston 16 GB 266x CF card is going for about $35 on tigerdirect, a 32GB 266x for $75, so consider getting a few . Some smartphones use mini-SD, but I am not sure which class card/stick would be best (I don't own a smartphone. And no, I'm not a Luddite)
Otakon attendee since 1996 - been watching anime since the 1960's
Member number is really 1,321.

#63 Gremlich

Gremlich

    Otaku In Training

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 234 posts

Posted 10 March 2012 - 07:37 AM

For dSLR owners, minimize your lens selection. I typically just take my 18-105mm kit lens that I got with my D90. The other lens I MIGHT take is the 10-24mm f/3.5. If you take too many lenses, you'll take the chance of missing the shot.

Smartphone owners, check this out -- a fisheye, Macro and telephoto lens kit for $50 (this is just one example, there may be more) Photojojo says they fit ANY camera, though I would contact them and ask first, the images they show only have the iPhone depicted. Here is a review from someone with a Droid.
Otakon attendee since 1996 - been watching anime since the 1960's
Member number is really 1,321.

#64 Clutch

Clutch

    Otaku In Training

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 290 posts

Posted 10 March 2012 - 09:16 AM

For dSLR owners, minimize your lens selection. I typically just take my 18-105mm kit lens that I got with my D90. The other lens I MIGHT take is the 10-24mm f/3.5. If you take too many lenses, you'll take the chance of missing the shot.


Wouldn't you also want to take your fastest lens? Like anything closest to f 2.0, for better night shots?

Edit: I got a photo from the 25th floor, of what was the Wyndam, of the Baltimore street lights by holding my camera against the window, and turning off the flash. It came out grainy, but I really liked it.

Edited by Clutch, 10 March 2012 - 09:20 AM.

Otakon attendee since 1994 Posted Image
Posted Image

#65 Gremlich

Gremlich

    Otaku In Training

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 234 posts

Posted 11 March 2012 - 04:12 PM

Certainly you'd want to take your faster lenses, but the f/1.4 to f/2.8 lenses are crazy expensive. If you have a high ISO, you can compensate for a slower lens. I have 35mm f/1.8 that's good for a few things, like night shots, but the subject needs to call for it.

If you go look at my images on 500px.com/gremlich, you'll see what I did with an f/3.5 10-24mm Nikkor. look at the exif data, this image:

Edited by Gremlich, 11 March 2012 - 04:13 PM.

Otakon attendee since 1996 - been watching anime since the 1960's
Member number is really 1,321.

#66 Gremlich

Gremlich

    Otaku In Training

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 234 posts

Posted 13 March 2012 - 05:44 PM

This offer from Craft and Vision expires quickly! This Saturday, 17 March. The books are usually pretty cheap anyways, but $4 for a book that is right up Otakon picture takers' alley:

For the next five days only, use the promotional code MUGSHOTS4 when you checkout so you can have the PDF version of Forget Mugshots for only $4 OR use the code MUGSHOTS20 to get 20% off when you buy 5+ PDF eBooks from the Craft & Vision collection. These codes expire at 11:59pm PST March 17, 2012.
Otakon attendee since 1996 - been watching anime since the 1960's
Member number is really 1,321.

#67 Ilstefan

Ilstefan

    Fresh Meat

  • Members
  • 8 posts

Posted 02 April 2012 - 02:19 PM

Another photographer here. Just a word of warning, I have never seen a picture taken on Auto that didn't look pretty bad. If you want to shoot and get good results, you need to understand exposure, and I don't think that's been covered in-depth in this thread.

Exposure is determined by three things: Aperture, Shutter Speed, and ISO.

Aperture is the circular hole in a lens that light passes through to reach the sensor/film. this is indicated as an F stop, which follows the format of f/4, f/1.8, f/11, and the like. This can be adjusted, and the larger the number after the backslash, the narrower the aperture is. For instance, f/22 is a very narrow aperture, while f/1.8 is a very wide aperture. Wide apertures let in a lot of light, which is good for poorly lit photos, but gives a narrower "depth of field," or area in focus. Narrow apertures have larger depth of field, but let in much less light.

Shutter Speed is the amount of time the sensor/film is exposed to light. This is written as fractions of a second, such as 1/1000 (One thousandth of a second) or 1/30 (one thirtieth of a second.) A slow shutter speed will expose the sensor to more light, but moving objects will be more blurred. In general, your shutter speed shouldn't go lower than 1/30, as a slower speed will start to show blur from your hands shaking.

ISO is how sensitive your sensor is to light. This is based on film, which would be made in different ISO grades, such as 100, 400, 1600, and the like. While a film camera would need to have the film physically changed to get a different ISO, digital cameras can change it through a menu. A high ISO rating is more sensitive to light (good for dark conditions) but will have more grain, which can get very obnoxious-looking on modern digital cameras.

Your camera's manual will tell you how to read your camera's light meter, which tends to be different for each camera manufacturer and I won't bother trying to explain something that may not apply for you. in general, to get a proper exposure you want to "zero" the meter.

A light meter can have several "modes." I'm not to cover them all, the two ones you'll be concerned with are Average and spot. Average scans the entire image and "Averages" a metering result from the whole thing. Spot scans a patch in the center of the frame and gives you a reading from that. Spot is more precise, but is a bit more tricky to use. The best way to use spot is to aim your camera at a highlight and meter off of that.

Many cameras have different picture modes. Its shown as a list of pictograms and letters, such as "M," 'P," "A-Dep," and the like. Yours is probably set to "auto," which is almost certainly written in green or is just a green box. There are two modes you want to use:

Program [P]: sometimes referred to as "smart auto," P will use your light meter to calculate an even exposure. Unlike Auto, however, you can change the Shutter Speed or Aperture and your camera will automatically change the other to maintain the same exposure. This mode works best with Average exposure metering.

Manual [M]: This is the mode for someone who knows their way around a camera. Your camera will do absolutely nothing for you except focus, you have to manually set aperture, shutter, and ISO yourself. This is much trickier, but can give you a much more rewarding image. Manual works best with Spot metering.

You do not need a high-end dSLR to make use of this guide. Even lower end cameras have manual control, only the very cheapest sub-$100 cameras will lack this control. It is, admittedly, easier on a dSLR (as they are larger, they have more space for the controls) but its not impossible on a point-and-shoot.

Edited by Ilstefan, 02 April 2012 - 02:20 PM.


#68 Gremlich

Gremlich

    Otaku In Training

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 234 posts

Posted 05 April 2012 - 09:27 PM

Thanx mate, always great to have the basics added to this. I may have just provided links, but your posted content is waaay better to have.

As most people are more and more using their smartphones for their photography - whether for happy snaps or documentary, composition is the most important thing for them after the basics. Knowing how to stand and where, relative to the subject, figure in greatly. Since I do not own a smartphone and can do little more than what I've done, here is a link to a Fox news article on iPhoneography (generic title) which features links to some hopefully useful resources. Don't forget Snapseed by Nik Software.

Lightroom 4 is available for $150, half the price LR3 was. (mongo sad) It is a GPU intensive program for full feature usage, but you can shut that off. (That means it will use your video card if you have one and eat up your system resource if you have on-board video only)(You better be running OS 7 64-bit and have 8 GB of RAM if you have PC if you don't have a discrete vid card)

And if you have a dSLR or compact digital camera, ALWAYS shoot in RAW. You'll capture so much more than a jpeg would.

Edited by Gremlich, 05 April 2012 - 09:28 PM.

Otakon attendee since 1996 - been watching anime since the 1960's
Member number is really 1,321.

#69 Gremlich

Gremlich

    Otaku In Training

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 234 posts

Posted 15 April 2012 - 09:42 AM

Here's a link from the photography.ca forums on aperture/iso/shutter/etc. where you see film speed, substitute ISO

here's another link with daily tips for composition, some oif this will be useful for smartphone photography
Otakon attendee since 1996 - been watching anime since the 1960's
Member number is really 1,321.

#70 Gremlich

Gremlich

    Otaku In Training

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 234 posts

Posted 15 April 2012 - 09:57 AM

Carrying solutions.

Have decided to bring too much kit to carry it all in a pocket? Don't want to carry a purse/murse, duffle, or limited utility backpack/shoulder bag?

Look at Kata, Lowepro, Tamrac for possible options. Think of something to carry a camera up to dSLR size, one lens (if you have them) cleaning kit, phone, memory sticks, ID/wallet, sunglasses, lunch, a bottle of water and maybe extra room big enough for a nong shim-sized instant noodle.
Otakon attendee since 1996 - been watching anime since the 1960's
Member number is really 1,321.

#71 zibbazabba905

zibbazabba905

    Fresh Meat

  • Members
  • 3 posts

Posted 23 April 2012 - 06:17 PM

I would like to try out doing photoshoots, keeping them free and simple, since I'm still new and so people don't expect too much, which would also be good for the ones in the middle to lower end of the cosplay spectrum where they spend so much time and effort on the cosplay but never get a photoshoot done. I thought of doing a "free photoshoot" sign AFTER my local convention was over, however Otakon doesn't allow signage or whatnot. Any ideas as to how I can do this? I don't really want to just go around asking, because everyone's got their own things to do; I'm more looking for people who have 5-15 minutes to spare

#72 neehowmaa

neehowmaa

    Fresh Meat

  • Members
  • 7 posts

Posted 27 April 2012 - 11:00 AM

Great tips posted here by everyone!

I would like to try out doing photoshoots, keeping them free and simple, since I'm still new and so people don't expect too much, which would also be good for the ones in the middle to lower end of the cosplay spectrum where they spend so much time and effort on the cosplay but never get a photoshoot done. I thought of doing a "free photoshoot" sign AFTER my local convention was over, however Otakon doesn't allow signage or whatnot. Any ideas as to how I can do this? I don't really want to just go around asking, because everyone's got their own things to do; I'm more looking for people who have 5-15 minutes to spare


I suggest staying away from signs like you said, and keeping it outdoors (just outside the center) as that's where I've had the best luck.

I will be doing some shoots and may throw a little group session together if there are enough photographer types that want to get some practice with a willing group. Would something like that interest you?

#73 rotinoma

rotinoma

    Seasoned Otaku

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 625 posts

Posted 04 June 2012 - 01:10 PM

Carrying solutions.

Have decided to bring too much kit to carry it all in a pocket? Don't want to carry a purse/murse, duffle, or limited utility backpack/shoulder bag?

Look at Kata, Lowepro, Tamrac for possible options. Think of something to carry a camera up to dSLR size, one lens (if you have them) cleaning kit, phone, memory sticks, ID/wallet, sunglasses, lunch, a bottle of water and maybe extra room big enough for a nong shim-sized instant noodle.


btw thanks for making the thread.

Just want to add my 2c:
1. I've been using thisbag with my NEX-5, and it's great. Small and handy! I'm going to try to live with 2 lenses for Otakon, and I'm getting a lens pouch for the second one, which can go on my belt hoops or on the camera bag. I actually got both off ebay (even if you don't buy from it, it's a good way to find a list of things out there), but anyway.
2. I'm enjoying taking shots with a prime lens. It does work 90% of the time at a con (at least the one con I've used this setup for). But I guess 10% of the time is why I'm going to try for 2 lenses. I don't think it's going to be a problem, no more than the fact that I have to carry a zoom lens. i'm no photographer but obviously use common sense and pack the lenses best fit for the sort of shots you will take. For example the zoom is only going to be used for events and not hall cosplay (probably).
3. I also enjoy not having to pack a flash and still have most of my shots come out good, but that is just me Posted Image Lots of good lighting advice and notes in this thread.

Edited by rotinoma, 04 June 2012 - 01:11 PM.


#74 Fadamor

Fadamor

    This title space for rent! Reasonable rates! Ask within.

  • Veteran Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,233 posts

Posted 16 June 2012 - 05:18 PM

Installed an HDR app in my Samsung Galaxy Droid phone. I'm very impressed with the results! I think I'll be using that one rather than my "big" digi-kameh at the con.

#75 Gremlich

Gremlich

    Otaku In Training

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 234 posts

Posted 16 June 2012 - 06:26 PM

Something new, and FREE, for iPhones/iPods - Smugmug's Camera Awesome. Read a review, then go to the iTunes store and download it.

Remember, if you have an android phone, Nik software's Snapseed is a very good app, but it costs.
Otakon attendee since 1996 - been watching anime since the 1960's
Member number is really 1,321.

#76 Fadamor

Fadamor

    This title space for rent! Reasonable rates! Ask within.

  • Veteran Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,233 posts

Posted 16 June 2012 - 10:28 PM

At the local Don Pablo's, I was sitting next to this plant in the sun and decided to try out the HDR on my smartphone. The sun on the leaf was causing big-time bloom, but the HDR knocked it down quite a bit.

Posted Image

#77 Gremlich

Gremlich

    Otaku In Training

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 234 posts

Posted 08 July 2012 - 01:38 PM

If you could have reflected some light onto the stone thing to the left........
Otakon attendee since 1996 - been watching anime since the 1960's
Member number is really 1,321.