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alabaster

Alabaster's Q&A (NOT guest requests!)

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How do you expect the move to DC to affect your ability to 'recruit' guests?  I would think that for a guest, going to DC would have more allure compared to Baltimore.  Also if you guys expect a revenue increase then that might have an affect as well.

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Along those lines...Maryland is known for crab and crabcake. Let's just say I have noticed many guests from Japan really digging this fact in public (in person or on social media). What would be DC's one culinary attraction?

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Since Otakon tends to get repeat guests, how frequently do guests want to return in general? To that end, in your work with guests what tends to be their thoughts/feelings after the convention (in terms or enjoyment, annoyances, etc.)?

What would be DC's one culinary attraction?

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I had a question do you guys usually spread the guests among the con hotels or put them in all one hotel if you can answer it

 

Probably best NOT to answer, or discuss that.  :)

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How do you expect the move to DC to affect your ability to 'recruit' guests?  I would think that for a guest, going to DC would have more allure compared to Baltimore.  Also if you guys expect a revenue increase then that might have an affect as well.

We typically budget on the assumption of flat revenue.

 

Yes, DC is an easier sell than Baltimore, and it's much easier to do sightseeing excursions to DC when you're already there.

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Along those lines...Maryland is known for crab and crabcake. Let's just say I have noticed many guests from Japan really digging this fact in public (in person or on social media). What would be DC's one culinary attraction?

 

Still crabcakes / crabs.   Though I also recommend a good half smoke. :)

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Since Otakon tends to get repeat guests, how frequently do guests want to return in general? To that end, in your work with guests what tends to be their thoughts/feelings after the convention (in terms or enjoyment, annoyances, etc.)?

 

Actually, we rarely repeat guests from the prior year, the notable exception being Maruyama-san -- and he has been a tireless advocate for us over the years, helping us reach out to new people or giving his personal opinion of us (which carries considerable weight).  He is an honorary staffer, technically a member of our Tokyo Outreach staff (though I keep joking that we'll put him in registration one year if he's a bad boy), and he even has Otakon business cards.

 

But yes, we do have friends who seem to come every few years.  Some would come every year if we let them, but I don't believe that's healthy for most guests or for most cons.  the risk of stagnation is high.  Because many of these people have become friends over the years, it's difficult to say "sorry, we just had you last year, let's at least give you a year or two off.."  I wish I could hang with friends every year -- but that limits your ability to do anything new.  So my general rule is that we don't do consecutive years, and I prefer at least 2-3 years between visits by long-term, big-name friends of the con.

 

At hte same time, I want a few folks (especially on the voice actor side) who've been before and get our rhythm, so we usually do that as well. 

 

The reason we have guests wanting to come back, I think, is that we try to treat them like people, we deliver what we promise, and we don't pull anything shady -- and if we screw up, we do our best to make good on it.  We stay in touch whenever possible, and as noted, many personal friendships can develop and blossom from that approach. It's not unusual for me to get asked about another con, or another guest handler.

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Yeah, I've been scooped before and a few of them hurt...and sometimes it's not even other cons who grab a guest first. This year I got scooped by Lady Gaga... 

 

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Yeah, I've been scooped before and a few of them hurt...and sometimes it's not even other cons who grab a guest first. This year I got scooped by Lady Gaga...

 

Baby Metal or Momoiro Clover Z?

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Yeah, I've been scooped before and a few of them hurt...and sometimes it's not even other cons who grab a guest first. This year I got scooped by Lady Gaga... 

 

 

Baby Metal or Momoiro Clover Z?

 

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Babymetal came out of nowhere and *all* of us big cons jumped to get them -- probably wisely for them, they held out for the commercial gigs and their shot at the big time.  Clover Z  was a case of timing not working out.  And as for Hatsune Miku, longtime participants in the guest thread know my general feelings on inviting "virtual" guests.

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(I can't find a way to quote on mobile.)

But are you trying to tell me you guys were trying to get Crayon Pop?! I literally would have dropped dead.

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(I can't find a way to quote on mobile.)

But are you trying to tell me you guys were trying to get Crayon Pop?! I literally would have dropped dead.

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(I can't find a way to quote on mobile.)

But are you trying to tell me you guys were trying to get Crayon Pop?! I literally would have dropped dead.

You can tap a post on the mobile view and a quote button should show up in the lower right corner.

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And as for Hatsune Miku, longtime participants in the guest thread know my general feelings on inviting "virtual" guests.

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And as for Hatsune Miku, longtime participants in the guest thread know my general feelings on inviting "virtual" guests.

Get with the times man!

 

Thankfully she's baller enough to do her own shows now.

 

 

And I'm sure they're cool shows, but there is no person to be a guest.  Again, this isn't about personal preference, but about a strategic decision and a clear idea of what makes a good guest.

 

You can have her as a guest in your own home and have her sing for you personally, if you get the right software.

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My understanding is the official Hatsune Miku shows are backed by live bands. A little bit different from a piece of software in your home.

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My understanding is the official Hatsune Miku shows are backed by live bands. A little bit different from a piece of software in your home.

 

I know, and I was being facetious.  :)

 

My point is that we did have the developers out here when the project was relatively new; however, AX had a big concert with a little help from Toyota, when the commercial featuring her was hot.  That moment has passed, and will never come again.

 

When we bring a musical guest, the expense is *considerably* higher than for other guests -- aside from the cost of the show itself, there's the costs that I worry about in my budget, which are mostly the costs of travel and rooms.

 

Altima is three "principals" (each with some following of their own) plus backing team. They do interviews, Q&A, autographings, etc. 

 

Hatsune Miku is one virtual "principal" plus backing team. It's possible the band does Q&A and talk but are they really part of the creative process? Do they sign your CD?

 

Given the choice between a virtual idol and a real person, I will almost always choose a real person.

 

It has already been done pretty well in LA, several years ago; it has been done repeatedly in touring on a smaller scale, and it can be done on the cheap by smaller events.  What's the advantage of doing it at Otakon? Does it bring a hot new act or an industry icon to us?  Does it call your attention to something novel or game-changing?   The best that can be said, IMO, is that it brings a current cultural fad to our event.  Which is worth doing, but probably not given the expense involved.

 

Some guests gain extra value for the connections they bring -- that's why guests like Yoshiki (or Maruyama, on the anime side) carry extra value.  When they talk about the great time they had and how it made them feel a real connection with their international fanbase, or give personal recommendations, that counts for an awful lot in terms of our reach for future guests.  So no win there for a virtual guest.

 

The other element is publicity; it's been done by other cons and now Lady Gaga, so they're getting plenty out of it on their end, but Otakon wouldn't gain much. It isn't new to the con scene or something our members aren't aware of.

 

So I see this is as of limited value in terms of mission, of limited value in terms of guests, and of limited value in terms of publicity -- it's a perfect gimmick for Lady Gaga to incorporate into her extended riff on image, but for me the value just isn't there.

 

Mind you I am not ruling out any future project there -- just saying that there hasn't been the right combination of factors so far, and I am not convinced there will be before people get bored of virtual pop stars.

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Babymetal came out of nowhere and *all* of us big cons jumped to get them -- probably wisely for them, they held out for the commercial gigs and their shot at the big time.  Clover Z  was a case of timing not working out.  And as for Hatsune Miku, longtime participants in the guest thread know my general feelings on inviting "virtual" guests.

 

 

But what about Sharon Apple?

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Maybe the wrong place to ask, but figured it is a decent place!

Is it possible to find a list of who is doing the panels this year, and who did them last year?

I went to an amazing panel on "Pokemon as a Mythical Narrative" last year, and would love to know (1) Who did the panel and (2) if they are doing any more this year.

Thanks!

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My understanding is the official Hatsune Miku shows are backed by live bands. A little bit different from a piece of software in your home.

 

I know, and I was being facetious.  smile.png

 

My point is that we did have the developers out here when the project was relatively new; however, AX had a big concert with a little help from Toyota, when the commercial featuring her was hot.  That moment has passed, and will never come again.

 

When we bring a musical guest, the expense is *considerably* higher than for other guests -- aside from the cost of the show itself, there's the costs that I worry about in my budget, which are mostly the costs of travel and rooms.

 

Altima is three "principals" (each with some following of their own) plus backing team. They do interviews, Q&A, autographings, etc. 

 

Hatsune Miku is one virtual "principal" plus backing team. It's possible the band does Q&A and talk but are they really part of the creative process? Do they sign your CD?

 

Given the choice between a virtual idol and a real person, I will almost always choose a real person.

 

It has already been done pretty well in LA, several years ago; it has been done repeatedly in touring on a smaller scale, and it can be done on the cheap by smaller events.  What's the advantage of doing it at Otakon? Does it bring a hot new act or an industry icon to us?  Does it call your attention to something novel or game-changing?   The best that can be said, IMO, is that it brings a current cultural fad to our event.  Which is worth doing, but probably not given the expense involved.

 

Some guests gain extra value for the connections they bring -- that's why guests like Yoshiki (or Maruyama, on the anime side) carry extra value.  When they talk about the great time they had and how it made them feel a real connection with their international fanbase, or give personal recommendations, that counts for an awful lot in terms of our reach for future guests.  So no win there for a virtual guest.

 

The other element is publicity; it's been done by other cons and now Lady Gaga, so they're getting plenty out of it on their end, but Otakon wouldn't gain much. It isn't new to the con scene or something our members aren't aware of.

 

So I see this is as of limited value in terms of mission, of limited value in terms of guests, and of limited value in terms of publicity -- it's a perfect gimmick for Lady Gaga to incorporate into her extended riff on image, but for me the value just isn't there.

 

Mind you I am not ruling out any future project there -- just saying that there hasn't been the right combination of factors so far, and I am not convinced there will be before people get bored of virtual pop stars.

 

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Babymetal came out of nowhere and *all* of us big cons jumped to get them -- probably wisely for them, they held out for the commercial gigs and their shot at the big time.  Clover Z  was a case of timing not working out.  And as for Hatsune Miku, longtime participants in the guest thread know my general feelings on inviting "virtual" guests.

 

 

But what about Sharon Apple?

 

You only say things like that because you know I won't actually kill you. :)

Maybe the wrong place to ask, but figured it is a decent place!

Is it possible to find a list of who is doing the panels this year, and who did them last year?

I went to an amazing panel on "Pokemon as a Mythical Narrative" last year, and would love to know (1) Who did the panel and (2) if they are doing any more this year.

Thanks!

 

You might be able to find out from the folks in the Panels section, but at the moment everyone's busy finalizing this year's schedule, so it's hard to spare much time for anything that isn't on fire.  Fortunately this sort of dialog is part of my job (and i have stuff to upload) so you get a few extra minutes of my time. :)

 

You might have a quicker response via google-fu.

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My understanding is the official Hatsune Miku shows are backed by live bands. A little bit different from a piece of software in your home.

 

I know, and I was being facetious.  smile.png

 

My point is that we did have the developers out here when the project was relatively new; however, AX had a big concert with a little help from Toyota, when the commercial featuring her was hot.  That moment has passed, and will never come again.

 

When we bring a musical guest, the expense is *considerably* higher than for other guests -- aside from the cost of the show itself, there's the costs that I worry about in my budget, which are mostly the costs of travel and rooms.

 

Altima is three "principals" (each with some following of their own) plus backing team. They do interviews, Q&A, autographings, etc. 

 

Hatsune Miku is one virtual "principal" plus backing team. It's possible the band does Q&A and talk but are they really part of the creative process? Do they sign your CD?

 

Given the choice between a virtual idol and a real person, I will almost always choose a real person.

 

It has already been done pretty well in LA, several years ago; it has been done repeatedly in touring on a smaller scale, and it can be done on the cheap by smaller events.  What's the advantage of doing it at Otakon? Does it bring a hot new act or an industry icon to us?  Does it call your attention to something novel or game-changing?   The best that can be said, IMO, is that it brings a current cultural fad to our event.  Which is worth doing, but probably not given the expense involved.

 

Some guests gain extra value for the connections they bring -- that's why guests like Yoshiki (or Maruyama, on the anime side) carry extra value.  When they talk about the great time they had and how it made them feel a real connection with their international fanbase, or give personal recommendations, that counts for an awful lot in terms of our reach for future guests.  So no win there for a virtual guest.

 

The other element is publicity; it's been done by other cons and now Lady Gaga, so they're getting plenty out of it on their end, but Otakon wouldn't gain much. It isn't new to the con scene or something our members aren't aware of.

 

So I see this is as of limited value in terms of mission, of limited value in terms of guests, and of limited value in terms of publicity -- it's a perfect gimmick for Lady Gaga to incorporate into her extended riff on image, but for me the value just isn't there.

 

Mind you I am not ruling out any future project there -- just saying that there hasn't been the right combination of factors so far, and I am not convinced there will be before people get bored of virtual pop stars.

 

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Again, to me, it's about getting guests that represent a mix of "now" and "historic". 

 

Miku is a performance, no doubt there. And I certainly don't mean to downplay the work that goes into the show or the creation involved. . 

But the impact of bringing them at this point is pretty small, unless we go really big -- and I'd prefer to save that for something more real.  I try to get good value for the expense, and the value adds here are pretty nominal -- especially since they're touring anyway.

 

My personal feeling is that the fad will fade eventually, or at least it'll evolve into something else. To my ears, the songs sound aggressively autotuned and the voices lack soul.  But again, I don't make these decisions in a vacuum and aside from staff with a strong interest, there are folks in the industry who are happy to weigh in on our choices in private. (I often ask our musical guests and industry insiders who they think would be a good fit for Otakon.)   My personal taste has rarely been the overriding guide here, with Yoshida Brothers and Kanno being two pretty rare moments where I chased someone for a long time because *I* wanted them, and even then there was plenty of justifcation and I think my choice was validated!  :)

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Hmm. This faerie wants to agree with Jim here, but the same could be said with pop music in general, jncluding J-pop. More oft than not I really dig the grooves of the musical acts brought up here (matsuri included), because they have a unique flavor you don't get from the mainstream yes. What I suggest the Otakorp keep on mind is to keep showcasing these unique flavors, for that I feel keeps many Otakon goers coming back for more.

Miku may be very popular but also a bit oversaturated, which is why I don't really think a Miku concert would go well in Baltimore (or Washington for that matter) as she is right now.

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The thing about fads is if you miss them on the upswing, you don't really want to adopt on the way out.

 

Otakon should be leading, not chasing. 

 

Some fads come and go; others stand the test of time. Some performers reinvent themselves constantly. Some have always had their hearts on two planets, so to speak.

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If Hatsune manages to David Bowie themselves then I'll be impressed.

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If Hatsune manages to David Bowie themselves then I'll be impressed.

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If Hatsune manages to David Bowie themselves then I'll be impressed.

OI! whats wrong with David Bowie? 

 

Nothing lol. Jim mentioned reinventing themselves and Bowie, as we all know, has mastered that.

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But again, I don't make these decisions in a vacuum and aside from staff with a strong interest, there are folks in the industry who are happy to weigh in on our choices in private. (I often ask our musical guests and industry insiders who they think would be a good fit for Otakon.)   My personal taste has rarely been the overriding guide here, with Yoshida Brothers and Kanno being two pretty rare moments where I chased someone for a long time because *I* wanted them, and even then there was plenty of justifcation and I think my choice was validated!  smile.png

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Putting it into words is rough, but: generally speaking I go for acts that have real musical chops over acts that are just pretty faces and auto tune; people who are musicians first and stars second; acts that seem like they would get what we do and embrace it.

I rely on people who are fans of the music to tell me who is catching fire, and people in the industry to tell me who is likely to stick around. I look at the followings online and I try to find out how the act sounds live.

I try to find a mix of sounds that balance each other, so if one group is high energy bouncy dance stuff, the other should not be. We have done sparkly pop princesses, and spikes haired rock stars in leather. If it brings something different to the mix, I will consider it.

And it evolves as the year progresses. I started out this year thinking jazz and k-pop,

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Since Otakon tends to get repeat guests, how frequently do guests want to return in general? To that end, in your work with guests what tends to be their thoughts/feelings after the convention (in terms or enjoyment, annoyances, etc.)?

 

Actually, we rarely repeat guests from the prior year, the notable exception being Maruyama-san -- and he has been a tireless advocate for us over the years, helping us reach out to new people or giving his personal opinion of us (which carries considerable weight).  He is an honorary staffer, technically a member of our Tokyo Outreach staff (though I keep joking that we'll put him in registration one year if he's a bad boy), and he even has Otakon business cards.

 

But yes, we do have friends who seem to come every few years.  Some would come every year if we let them, but I don't believe that's healthy for most guests or for most cons.  the risk of stagnation is high.  Because many of these people have become friends over the years, it's difficult to say "sorry, we just had you last year, let's at least give you a year or two off.."  I wish I could hang with friends every year -- but that limits your ability to do anything new.  So my general rule is that we don't do consecutive years, and I prefer at least 2-3 years between visits by long-term, big-name friends of the con.

 

At hte same time, I want a few folks (especially on the voice actor side) who've been before and get our rhythm, so we usually do that as well. 

 

The reason we have guests wanting to come back, I think, is that we try to treat them like people, we deliver what we promise, and we don't pull anything shady -- and if we screw up, we do our best to make good on it.  We stay in touch whenever possible, and as noted, many personal friendships can develop and blossom from that approach. It's not unusual for me to get asked about another con, or another guest handler.

 

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If you guys have a rule of bringing certain big name guests every 2-3 years, then how would you explain having a big name voice actor like J. Michael Tatum for 3 years in a row?

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If you guys have a rule of bringing certain big name guests every 2-3 years, then how would you explain having a big name voice actor like J. Michael Tatum for 3 years in a row?

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Putting it into words is rough, but: generally speaking I go for acts that have real musical chops over acts that are just pretty faces and auto tune; people who are musicians first and stars second; acts that seem like they would get what we do and embrace it.

I rely on people who are fans of the music to tell me who is catching fire, and people in the industry to tell me who is likely to stick around. I look at the followings online and I try to find out how the act sounds live.

I try to find a mix of sounds that balance each other, so if one group is high energy bouncy dance stuff, the other should not be. We have done sparkly pop princesses, and spikes haired rock stars in leather. If it brings something different to the mix, I will consider it.

And it evolves as the year progresses. I started out this year thinking jazz and k-pop,

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yet we didnt get any jazz... )-=

 

bummer

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If you guys have a rule of bringing certain big name guests every 2-3 years, then how would you explain having a big name voice actor like J. Michael Tatum for 3 years in a row?

 

 

Simple:  he came as Funimation's guest at least one of those times (and possibly two; I don't remember). 

 

Peter S Beagle comes as Conlan Press's guest pretty much every year.

 

If they aren't costing me resources, they can come as often as they like. :)

 

Look, i love seeing my friends, and many of these people are very much friends. As in, I hang out with certain folks when I'm in certain towns, if schedules allow.  I'm not saying that to make you jealous, but to make it clear that I try not to play favorites.  Tatum and I talk Doctor Who like super-nerds, and Epcar and I commisserate about the perils of being tall.

 

But I have a limited budget and while I love seeing friends, I can't have them every year.   :)

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If you guys have a rule of bringing certain big name guests every 2-3 years, then how would you explain having a big name voice actor like J. Michael Tatum for 3 years in a row?

After attending Otakon for so long I no longer am o_0 when observing that portions of the con's guest list seem tailored to help promote whatever big thing that the big companies seek to promote at Otakon.  Sometimes greatness actually comes of it, like Todd Haberkorn stealing the show at the Opening Ceremonies by cosplaying Superman or the humorous Crispin Freeman panel.

 

Humorously (at least I find it so), there are some repeat Otakon guests whom I've yet to encounter, the Studio MADHOUSE guy (Masao Maruyama) being the most notable as he's been to more Otakons than I have.

 

 

I urge you to show up for a Maruyama panel. Seriously, there's a few reasons we love him here, but one of them is that his spirit animal is *clearly* Stitch....

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Putting it into words is rough, but: generally speaking I go for acts that have real musical chops over acts that are just pretty faces and auto tune; people who are musicians first and stars second; acts that seem like they would get what we do and embrace it.

I rely on people who are fans of the music to tell me who is catching fire, and people in the industry to tell me who is likely to stick around. I look at the followings online and I try to find out how the act sounds live.

I try to find a mix of sounds that balance each other, so if one group is high energy bouncy dance stuff, the other should not be. We have done sparkly pop princesses, and spikes haired rock stars in leather. If it brings something different to the mix, I will consider it.

And it evolves as the year progresses. I started out this year thinking jazz and k-pop,

 

...jazz and k-pop, ?

 

OK, that sounds reasonable, if a little judgmental LOL. But I guess that's why there's a "fit" and more a sense of brand in what would be an Otakon music guest, in this case.

 

Personally for me the #1, by far, criteria, is how good they are live. The whole image stuff come and go, the music is, too, part of the package and I think it's more about popularity. And it's hard to argue against giving what people want. It seems to me rather than judge a group on the music, it's better to make sure they're a quality act and offers diversity, or alternatively, is something you don't see at any other con. So I think if Otakon can continue to bring high caliber acts over that have a good show, no matter the music, and as long as it's "anime" enough, I'll be okay with it.

 

It's just sometimes I feel Otakon is in a pretty unique position in terms of music guests but the guest offerings don't always reflect what I think Otakon can be bringing to the fans. Maybe it's partly due to this precise "fit" but that's probably just me. As someone who flies to cons/concerts I'm okay with getting my idol fix elsewhere LOL but it's a little tough for the locals who can't do that.

 

 

Leave the word "precise" out.  You can't plug in a formula.  I know that I want the two shows we typically have to represent very different feels and very different sounds. I want a balance that is likely to have broad appeal.  If I have a really hot pop act that's a guaranteed crowd pleaser, I may take a chance on an act that's a bit more unexpected. If I have a huge blasting hard rock anthem coming from one show, the other might be a solo singer with karoake backing.

 

There are also tons of other considerations, including availability, cost, logistical requirements, etc. There are plenty of acts who we've had to pass on because of cost or timing. Others have made it clear they aren't interested in "otaku events" and I won't say more on that because at least one of them eventually changed their mind.

 

Being "anime enough" isn't the requirement, though in practice having at least one act have a strong anime tie is important; it's the mission that drives it all.  The Yoshida Brothers' main connection was to the Nintendo commercial, but the traditional music angle gives them plenty of relevance.

 

Our mission is to celebrate Asian pop culture and use it as a gateway for more learning.  The more diversity in presentation and style, the broader range of that culture we can reflect and share.

yet we didnt get any jazz... )-=

 

bummer

 

Well, I got Kanno last year and almost every song she played is a personal favorite, and MANY are jazzy/blues-y. :)

 

maybe next time...

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Has it ever been a thought to bring Japanese Tokusatsu actors (i.e. Super Sentai, Kamen Rider, Ultraman)  to Otakon, or is there not enough of an interest?

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On the topic of Hatsune Miku - I think anyone who has followed Vocaloid music to any significant degree knows that Vocaloid music is the result of people - some musicians by trade, some who have taken it up as a hobby, but all significant in my mind.  In a theoretical "Miku year", I think booking some high profile Vocaloid producers, like kz(livetune) or ryo(supercell) would easily make up the "people" side of the guest offering, with Miku herself simply being a piece of the puzzle.  I know I would jump at the chance to meet any of them, and even the people who come not really knowing what Vocaloid is will be given the opportunity to find out more.

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Being "anime enough" isn't the requirement, though in practice having at least one act have a strong anime tie is important; it's the mission that drives it all.  The Yoshida Brothers' main connection was to the Nintendo commercial, but the traditional music angle gives them plenty of relevance.

 

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Has it ever been a thought to bring Japanese Tokusatsu actors (i.e. Super Sentai, Kamen Rider, Ultraman)  to Otakon, or is there not enough of an interest?

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Has it ever been a thought to bring Japanese Tokusatsu actors (i.e. Super Sentai, Kamen Rider, Ultraman)  to Otakon, or is there not enough of an interest?

 

Thought, yes.

But I don't think there's enough interest in the actors to justify it unless they've been in something else, and we simply don't have the same connections there that we have to anime or music guests. 

 

The closest we came was we considered bringing one of the still-living original Godzilla actors -- by which I mean the guy in the suit -- but nothing really came of it.  There's little context.

On the topic of Hatsune Miku - I think anyone who has followed Vocaloid music to any significant degree knows that Vocaloid music is the result of people - some musicians by trade, some who have taken it up as a hobby, but all significant in my mind.  In a theoretical "Miku year", I think booking some high profile Vocaloid producers, like kz(livetune) or ryo(supercell) would easily make up the "people" side of the guest offering, with Miku herself simply being a piece of the puzzle.  I know I would jump at the chance to meet any of them, and even the people who come not really knowing what Vocaloid is will be given the opportunity to find out more.

 

*if* we went that route, that's much more like the sort of thing I'd be apt to consider, where you're talking about more of the creative process.

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The Mirai no Neiro panels at AX basically does that, but they're fan-run, not con-run.  I believe it's always done in two parts. This year, in Part 1, there were several Vocaloid Producers there who showcased some of their works. In Part 2, there was a mini-vocaloid show and then some Vocaloid documentary series by a professor at UCSD.

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Has it ever been a thought to bring Japanese Tokusatsu actors (i.e. Super Sentai, Kamen Rider, Ultraman)  to Otakon, or is there not enough of an interest?

 

Thought, yes.

But I don't think there's enough interest in the actors to justify it unless they've been in something else, and we simply don't have the same connections there that we have to anime or music guests. 

 

The closest we came was we considered bringing one of the still-living original Godzilla actors -- by which I mean the guy in the suit -- but nothing really came of it.  There's little context.

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Has it ever been a thought to bring Japanese Tokusatsu actors (i.e. Super Sentai, Kamen Rider, Ultraman)  to Otakon, or is there not enough of an interest?

 

Thought, yes.

But I don't think there's enough interest in the actors to justify it unless they've been in something else, and we simply don't have the same connections there that we have to anime or music guests. 

 

The closest we came was we considered bringing one of the still-living original Godzilla actors -- by which I mean the guy in the suit -- but nothing really came of it.  There's little context.

I would be interested... 

 

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